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Multi use?  :rattysmiley:

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Home Squeak Home / Re: Rat hammocks
« Last post by BigBen on February 18, 2017, 02:07:02 PM »
. . .

That said, when I make things for a friend's chinchilla, I use fleece only (and only seamless designs) because supposedly chinchillas can ingest the fabric if they chew it and exposed seams are an enticement to chew and if they ingest the woven fabric they can become impacted. I am not exactly sure how that works not having had a chinchilla, but it is what I have heard from the chinchilla community, so I follow their instructions. Rats will never ingest the fabric they chew, so impaction is not a risk.

. . .

I'm glad to hear that folks have used woven cloth for their rats without serious issues.  I guess the risk isn't as high as some of us have feared.

As for chins, yes--you don't dare give them anything to chew on but wood (and of course, pellets and hay) because they will swallow it and become impacted and that is life-threatening.  So no plastic wheels--only all-metal--and food bowls can't be plastic, either.  I haven't given my chins hammocks, because I didn't think even fleece would be safe.  So that's good to know.

I am fairly new to chinchillas, but I can tell you that they are a lot of fun and a lot less likely than rats to take sick, but when they get sick it's almost always life-threatening, if not inevitably fatal.  So the trick is to keep them as healthy as possible and not to let them get sick.  Interesting fact:  chins, unlike rats, can't brux, so they need to keep their incisors trimmed by gnawing.  (That's why chins chew on everything, I guess.)  But they are very sweet animals, and love to bounce around their enclosure.  And their fur is so soft!  Makes even the silkiest rex rat feel like terry cloth!
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+Nysander  So glad things worked out!  If the airborne stuff was bothering you, it was definitely a good idea to get the rats out of there for the duration.  Hope it doesn't take too long, and that the boys are back home in no time!
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I am selling the top half of a double critter nation for $50. Mild wear and tear, and everything is full functional. Must be able to meet within a 30 minute drive of the Lansing, MI area. PM me.
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Thank you guys!

I ended up asking around to family members and ultimately moving them to my grandmothers house until the renovations are done.

Maybe im an overprotective rat mom but the dust and musty smells kind of get to ME ( giving me a tickle in my throat and occasional cough, as well as a slight burning sensation, plus just the fact that it's stinky) so I just didn't feel right putting the boys through that knowing that they are MUCH more sensitive than me.

Especially since this work is likely to go on for 2+ weeks. ( they are tearing out the floors, drying them out, replumbing, and laying new vinyl plank flooring)

Also I recently learned that as a part of the process they are going to spray mildewicide before putting the new floor in. So we are probably going to move out ourselves for a couple of days to avoid those chemicals and I certainly wouldn't want the rats around that.  :BlueDumboBigEyes:

The boys are a little peeved at the move but they are doing fine so far over at my grandmothers. I've been going over there to visit and clean and make sure they are taken care of daily. And my eldest ( who really hates any changes to HIS space) pouted a bit, but we let him free range explore my grandmothers house ( after rat proofing) so that cheered him up a bit. ^^
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Home Squeak Home / Re: Rat hammocks
« Last post by Vonda Z on February 17, 2017, 07:48:58 PM »
I use a layer of cotton/flannel and a layer of fleece and have been for years and never had a problem. I throw things away when they get chewed, but even if they do a ton of damage in a single day - i have never had an issue.

That said, when I make things for a friend's chinchilla, I use fleece only (and only seamless designs) because supposedly chinchillas can ingest the fabric if they chew it and exposed seams are an enticement to chew and if they ingest the woven fabric they can become impacted. I am not exactly sure how that works not having had a chinchilla, but it is what I have heard from the chinchilla community, so I follow their instructions. Rats will never ingest the fabric they chew, so impaction is not a risk.

I think the hammocks work out better with a layer of each. My hammocks tend to be pocket style, so they can go into the fleecy warm inner area when cold or lay on top of the cooler cotton surface in warmer temps. Two layers of fleece produce very thick hammocks - especially if making pocket hammocks where several layers are sewn at once, and they can be a challenge for some sewing machines with so much fabric needing to pass under the presser foot, but a layer of fleece and cotton is just about perfect. And the cotton fabrics are always sharper and more vibrant than the fleece patterns.

But that is just my preference.
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Rat Care Corner / Re: New Oxbow rat food
« Last post by Vonda Z on February 17, 2017, 04:56:25 PM »
Interesting. I will have to find some time to look into the ingredients. I like the non-GMO part - which is surprising for a diet that contains soybeans. Interesting that the brown rice, which is the number one ingredient in the Adult Rat is missing completely in this one, but there is white rice instead, which doesn't seem like it would be as nutritious. The Menhaden Fish Meal is also not present, which I know will make some people happy as the safety of this ingredient has always been a question mark.
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Rat Care Corner / Re: New Oxbow rat food
« Last post by BigBen on February 17, 2017, 03:01:19 PM »
Umm I like that it is GMO free and that they add some nutritious ingredients...however I'm not sure about some of them like for instance orchard grass- that doesn't sound like something rats will like.

I also wonder if it's something they can digest.  When I was first investigating getting rats, the rescue warned me to stay away from foods with hay in them (alfalfa or timothy) because rats can't digest them, and so they are just so much filler (they are perfectly safe for rats to eat, the rescue said, just useless in terms of rat nutrition).  I have no idea whether the same applies to orchard grass or not.
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I know the concern.  I had a leak from the upstairs neighbors' bathtub that came through the ceiling near the rat cage.  While the workman sanded and repainted, I moved the rats into a temporary cage in the bathroom (my apartment is a studio) and covered the DCN with a tarp.  I also tried to vacuum up as much plaster dust as possible before uncovering the cage and returning the rats.  It seemed to work; I never noticed any problems.

Another suggestion besides those already posted is that you could tape a sheet of plastic over the rat-room door to help keep out dust.  It won't be perfect (construction dust can get through everything), but it will help a lot.  The real risk, to my mind, is not so much dust and the like is the volatile aromatic compounds from solvents and paint.  I suspect, however, that since the work is downstairs and the rats are upstairs, they will probably be fine.  Still, if you're really concerned by the strength of the odor, take them out for a few hours during the repainting (keeping the rat room shut up, naturally) and they'll be safe from the worst of it.
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Home Squeak Home / Re: Rat hammocks
« Last post by ILoveMyRatties on February 17, 2017, 08:44:01 AM »
I only use fleece. I know it is tempting to use flannel or cotton because they have such beautiful patterns...but it is safer to use only fleece in my opinion:)
i should add that even if it is safer, the chances of any problems are tiny. I've had rats who destroyed flannel and cotton and I still used those hammocks for quite some time and never had a problem. also if you keep your rats' nail short and rounded as opposed to sharp, even less chance of any accident.
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