Author Topic: Doggie Problem  (Read 4473 times)

Offline JohariZ

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Doggie Problem
« on: December 23, 2006, 06:50:27 PM »
Alrighty, I love my dog. She is really a great dog. We've overcome for the most part her fear of men. She is getting along famously with my husband, which I was afraid that she wouldn't.

The problem now is that we live in an apartment complex where our neighbors are close and when she barks, they can hear it easily. She doesn't bark incessantly she usually only barks a bit when she hears something strange or sees someone coming near our apartment.

I don't want her to stop entirely. I want her to give a warning bark for us, then we go check out whatever she barked at, and then when all is fine, she doesn't keep barking. That would be ideal. but she keeps barking a little bit.

What can I do? I don't want to stick her in her crate every time that she barks, then she'll not like her crate and she won't give warning barks especially when something is wrong. Right now I am going to check things out for her each time she barks, and if I've checked it out and it's not enough for her, I will pick her up and take her out for a look herself. (pick her up because I don't want to let her feel like she has to deal with the situation, that I have control of it).

What else would there be to do?

BTW, this is Sydney...



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Offline VegetarianPetLuvR

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2006, 11:52:09 PM »
I'm not sure what to suggest, but I have to say picking her up to go take a look is NOT a good idea. This is giving her attention for the barking, which only reinforces the behaviour, thus rewarding something you don't want to be rewarding. I've never dealt with a dog who barks excessively, so I have no other advice to offer you, but I'm sure someone here will have an idea. I just thought I'd point out that no-no.

Offline Blu Rat

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2006, 01:02:38 AM »
Hello!
I am by no means a certified dog anything....But have had a lot of experience with freelance dog training and worked with very good trainers. Trainers, and people here will tell you different things. You probably have a few options. Whatever you choose will take CONSISTANCY. Dogs thrive in direction and leadership and are more at ease when they know where in your "pack" they stand.
Right now, shes the one in charge! Everytime she barks, shes getting what she wants. To go out. As with Pavlov's dogs, I'm sure she has already learned this can be a useful tool. What I would suggest is to make sure she goes out at least a few times a day so you get to know what her normal amount to go is. Most younger dogs prefer to go out for a walk a day (good one) and go to the bathroom 3-4 times. Even this needs to be done on your time. Make it work for YOUR schedule. This may seem irrelevant, but knowing for SURE that shes not barking to go out is a good first step.
 I notice you have a harness on your dog. Are you opposed to choke "chains"? I put chains in parenthesis because they have nylon soft choke chains that still give a good correction, but wont pinch dogs with med-longer ears. It feels like regular collar material but is rolled and pulls like a choke chain.
 Once you get Sydney a nylon chain, let her drag a leash around the apartment for a bit. You can still walk her on a harness if you feel strongly about it but a choke chain gives you more control over your dog. When she gets over excited or barks, don't really say anything. Pick up the leash and give her a short quick correction. Say in a very flat voice "no".
 It is very important not to sound mad, or excited. Just use as best of a neutral voice as possible. Wait and see what she does. If you need to do this a few times. Just make sure not to pull on the choke chain. Hold on to the leash until the situation has diffused then simply walk away.
 Basically, you cant ignore the situation because she could become worse since she either thinks it doesn't bother you, or thinks shes getting away with it. But you want to train her to stop barking with as little emotion as possible. When you yell or give in you are no longer in control. Seeming calm and collected puts you exactly where you want to be. In charge.
 One other thing. a lot of dogs bark and freak out when they think they are going out. I know when your in a rush, this can be difficult to practice. But AS BEST YOU CAN, don't let the dog get to go out if she is in excited mode. This adds to the problem. If she knows how to sit it would be great to have her do that before she can go out. It may take some practice, but it would be well worth it. If she stands before you say "OK" to go out, make her sit again. This can be tedious, but it doesn't take very many repetitions before the dog understands that to get what it wants, it first has to do what you want.
 Crate training can also be a useful tool. I wont get into it, but you have the right idea not to put her in it when she is "bad". They will associate the crate with being punished and you wont get them to like being in there.
Good luck with you dog. She should be just fine! You seem willing to work a bit with her!
Keep us posted on how she is doing,
Em

Offline JohariZ

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2006, 04:25:09 PM »
OH no, I don't take Syd out when she barks. That was just one time the other day when even after I had checked things out for her, she still barked a little. It was the strange noises. After she saw what was making noise (the was the washer/dryer) She hasn't made a peep at all when somebody goes to use it. So I do know for sure that she isn't barking to go out. If she needs or wants to go out she'll put her paw on the front door.

I am not opposed to using choke chains. I actually use a pinch collar most of the time with her when we are going out. I know pinch collars seem so horrible, but it is the only thing that has worked at all to have her not pull. She also does have to sit and wait until I open the door, then when the door is open she can only go out, or in, if I say 'Ok, lets go'

She's a really good dog other than this little bit of barking... but actually since yesterday she has gotten much better, she's a quick learner.

Offline VegetarianPetLuvR

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2006, 10:44:40 PM »
As far as pulling goes...

My dog was brutal on leash when I first adopted her. She pulled constantly. I have never used a choke collar with her, and she now walks perfectly on a loosh leash, NO pulling. The method I used to train her out of it was very tedious, but there was no need for a choke or pinch collar and it worked incredibly well. I would simply stop every time she reached the end of the leash, and make her come back to my side before we started moving again. I would also randomly pass her down a treat while she was walking at my side. This takes some patience, but has worked wonders. A friend of mine used the same method on her very rambunctious puppy - he now walks nicely as well.

Offline JohariZ

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2006, 10:15:34 PM »
I have tried above method. Three months. I only started using the pinch collar at the beginning of this month. She will sometimes walk nicely on a harness, but only for a short while...

Oh her barking is so much better. Each time she barks a little I'll look outside real quick, then I'll have her come to me and sit. Once she sits for a moment, then the praise comes and she doesn't bark anymore. She's learning fast. I'm just waiting for the time that she'll bark a bit, then come automatically to me and sit... 

Offline stormcarver

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2007, 12:42:51 PM »
Barking:  We have an 8yo Aussie mix and 10mo GSD.  The older had taught the younger to bark at everything, which is something she started when the younger came to live with us.  It took a couple weeks, but we have corrected the problem.  When one barks at the door, we would verbally respond and give a click of the training clicker.  A quick look out the door or window was next, respecting that the girls were doing their job.  Then praise and a distracting treat.  You can usually tell when dogs are about to bark if you watch them and have spent time getting to know their cues.  The real point in this is to keep an eye on them and react quickly, after just one or two barks. 

The crate theory says that if they spend a lot of time in their crate, their "defendable world" becomes smaller and they will bark only when they feel protective or threatened within a very small "personal" space.  Although the theory has proven sound for many, I don't have the heart to employ the type of crate time this requires.

Pullin on the leash:  Our GSD was horrible about this!  Even through a CGC class, assigned a Gentle Leader "collar," she would not improve.  Finally, taking to heart the point that they need to be repetitively trained both outdoors and in, I started retraining Maia in the house.  With a fist full of her favorite treats, I led her around by the nose in heel position.  Whenever we did this, I would say "nice walk" repetitively.  When I stopped, I would signal her to sit and reiterate, with much enthusiasm and a treat, "Nice walk!"  Now, when we are outside, on a regular or extendable leash, and Maia begins to pull me around, I tell her "nice walk" and she quickly comes to my left side to fall into step.  I have never tried this with another dog (Maia is very smart and often requires creative solutions), but know that it worked well, within a week of nightly 5-minute sessions, for our hyper child.

Good luck!

Offline crtjh

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2007, 04:41:12 PM »
it sounds like my dog has a similar kind of problem with being afraid and barking at things outside.

pulling:
"My dog was brutal on leash when I first adopted her. She pulled constantly. I have never used a choke collar with her, and she now walks perfectly on a loosh leash, NO pulling. The method I used to train her out of it was very tedious, but there was no need for a choke or pinch collar and it worked incredibly well. I would simply stop every time she reached the end of the leash, and make her come back to my side before we started moving again. I would also randomly pass her down a treat while she was walking at my side. This takes some patience, but has worked wonders. A friend of mine used the same method on her very rambunctious puppy - he now walks nicely as well."

i use that same method and it works wonderfully. my friends dog pulls a little bit and i walked her for about 10 mins using that and she started walking really well for the rest of that walk. the only difference is instead of having the dog come back to me, in that way to keep them from pulling, at dog classes they told us to just wait until they looses the leash, on accident or on purpose. the can sit, turn their head, whatever, as long as the leash loosens.

the barking: it helps my dog if i point out what she is barking at to let her know i see it and say somehting like "i know, but its ok" or if a person is coming into the house acknowledging them.

Offline Mischief_Love

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Re: Doggie Problem
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2007, 10:00:17 PM »
I just want to say Sydney is ADORABLE!!! :BlueDumboSmile: Also, I'm definetly going to try those techniques with my dog,...she pulls so bad!

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