Author Topic: Pee/Poo Discouragement  (Read 2029 times)

Offline bug.dragon

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Pee/Poo Discouragement
« on: June 06, 2007, 11:09:22 PM »
Hello again,
I made a pen for my new bun that to my dismay I found he could hop out of...I didn't really mind because other than the RARE wayward poop, there were no problems...he mostly would go in his litter pan, and when he didn't use that he'd go in his pen, which i have special towels laid out across for him to do his business on. His cage is in my room (which is carpeted) so for the most part my room was his cage...he isn't a nibbler for wires, but i blocked mine off anyway, so other than a few of my less-favorite books on the bottom shelf loosing their bindings  ::), there was no problem.
However...it seems that he has taken a liking to my futon, and though it is still small in amount, if he goes anywhere it's on that...I have to admit, I really don't like having to change my sheets every day if i don't have to, plus i don't want it to soak into the mattress  :-\ is there something i can spray to discourage him? I can't think of anything, especially something that I wouldn't mind laying in after.
Any ideas?
A well-balanced person has a rat on each shoulder.
<:3 )~~ RIP Stella Baby and my other ratlets<:3*)~~

Pet's name: Nolita
Adopted by: Jill

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Offline BunGirl

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Re: Pee/Poo Discouragement
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2007, 04:23:30 PM »
I don't really know of anything you can spray on your futon to fix the problem, but here are a few ideas for you:

#1.  If the bunny hasn't been neutered, get that taken care of ASAP.  This could be him marking you (your sleeping place) as his territory.  If this is the case, you're probably not going to discourage him because the behavior is hormone driven and hard wired.

#2. Spend time in your bedroom with him.  Don't sit on your futon, and don't play with him or anything, just be there to observe (while you read a book or whatever).  Whenever he hops up on the futon, pay close attention.  As soon as that butt starts to lift, give him a sharp no and gently place him in the litter box to do his business.  Then make a big fuss when he goes in the box on his own and tell him what a good bunny he is.

#3. You could always try just blocking off the top of the pen when you're not around to supervise.  Often, placing a sheet or large cloth over the entire opening is enough.  If you need to, use clothes pins to secure the sheet on.  If that doesn't work, you may consider getting some plywood cut to size or something similar.
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Offline bug.dragon

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Re: Pee/Poo Discouragement
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2007, 06:22:49 PM »
I'm working on the picking up off of bed thing
I tried to use a blanket without and then with clothes pins (didn't work either way) so then i tried a wire top, didn't work either, so now he has a wooden top with ym ratties' cage sitting on top unless i'm in the room with him
i know about the neuter thing, but i have to save up a bit first before i do it, i plan on getting it done by the middle/end of the summer, depending on how many hours i get in...he is only 2 months old, so i have time, though i know sooner is better than later...i just wish eh would show progress by going ONLY in his litter box, not some in his litter box and some in his pen...oh well, time will tell
Is it common that there's a big mood switch when boys get neutered?
A well-balanced person has a rat on each shoulder.
<:3 )~~ RIP Stella Baby and my other ratlets<:3*)~~

Pet's name: Nolita
Adopted by: Jill

Adopt your own![/URL

Offline BunGirl

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Re: Pee/Poo Discouragement
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2007, 06:29:48 PM »
Sometimes, but not necessarily.  It cuts back on aggression, spraying (marking territory) and that type of thing, but the thought that they loose their energy seems to be a myth to me.  In the rescue, we often get in un-neutered males that are a few years of age, and of course, we have them fixed before they can socialize with the rest of the rabbits.  As long as your vet is experienced specifically with rabbits, you shouldn't have a problem with the neuter, no matter the age.  Of course, having a good bunny vet is key because they're so very different than your "normal" pets (cats and dogs) that most vets are trained to handle. 
Secretary, WildRescue Inc.