Author Topic: Ticks  (Read 5639 times)

Offline LadyRattus

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Ticks
« on: December 28, 2007, 12:34:12 AM »
Hey, our dog Molly has ticks, what should we do? how can you take them out safely???
"We fight dogs we kill cats.
Ain't no traps can stop the rats!
Got no plague, and got no fleas.
We drink poison, we steal cheese!
Mess with us, and you will see.
We'll put poison in your tea!
Here we'll fight, and here we'll stay...
AND WE WILL NEVER GO AWAY!"
~Terry Pratchett

Offline star2

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2007, 12:24:02 AM »
Can you take her to the vet?

I know nothing about ticks, but this seems to be a fairly decent article:
http://dogs.about.com/cs/disableddogs/qt/tick_removal.htm
~*Katie*~
Play hard at the bridge Aggie, Daisy, Fiona, Scarlett, and Robin

Offline Lise

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2007, 02:18:34 PM »
I just grab at the base and pull straight out with my fingers.
|| Lise ||

The Boy: Simon  The Girls: Arizona | Karma | Pepper | Penelope 

& Always Remembered: Molly, Nora, Tevy, Lucy, Guinness, Seagram, Pixie, Cleopatra, Skye, Bella, Juno, Sasha, Gibson

Offline LadyRattus

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2007, 12:01:21 PM »
Eep, we use tweezers. Infact, me and my mom just searched her for them, and got out quite a few.

And we just got a load of anti tick stuff, shampoo, collar, and some other stuff you put on their necks. We'll wash her today with the shampoo then use the collar and other stuff. Tell you if it works.
"We fight dogs we kill cats.
Ain't no traps can stop the rats!
Got no plague, and got no fleas.
We drink poison, we steal cheese!
Mess with us, and you will see.
We'll put poison in your tea!
Here we'll fight, and here we'll stay...
AND WE WILL NEVER GO AWAY!"
~Terry Pratchett

Offline Lise

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 02:23:14 PM »
If any of it is Hartz stuff bought over the counter, please don't use it on your dog.  Especially if that is a Hartz collar, or Hartz topical.

It doesn't really work, and there are many many horror stories as to its safety some I have seen with my own eyes.

Stick to a topical such as Frontline, or Advantix. 
|| Lise ||

The Boy: Simon  The Girls: Arizona | Karma | Pepper | Penelope 

& Always Remembered: Molly, Nora, Tevy, Lucy, Guinness, Seagram, Pixie, Cleopatra, Skye, Bella, Juno, Sasha, Gibson

Offline LOTR_Ratties

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2007, 06:06:03 PM »
Lise is completely right, please don't use Hartz. I have used K9 Advantix on my dogs for years, and it is awesome for ticks, fleas, and mosquitos. Please consider investing in some or a similar product like Lise mentioned, such as Frontline. I also use a natural shampoo with coconut oil to keep their coat and skin nice and soft, since they have a problem with itching without it. Good luck to you, please visit your vet and get a better product. Your doggy will thank you. :thumbsup2:

Offline LadyRattus

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2008, 10:32:52 AM »
None of the stuff is Hartz. The shampoo's the Zodiac, or something, I forget the collar's brand (we put it on, and nothing amazing's happened so far..) and the stuff is Frontline.
"We fight dogs we kill cats.
Ain't no traps can stop the rats!
Got no plague, and got no fleas.
We drink poison, we steal cheese!
Mess with us, and you will see.
We'll put poison in your tea!
Here we'll fight, and here we'll stay...
AND WE WILL NEVER GO AWAY!"
~Terry Pratchett

Offline QueenoftheWereRats

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2008, 08:54:57 PM »
i just wanted to add that if anyone uses hartz and they have cats, get rid of the product! if a cat licks it or it is absorbed thru their system it can be deadly! also, i would reccomend taking ur dog to the vet about 1 month-6 weeks after u find a tick on it, because u might want to test the animal for lymes disease. although topical tick products are wonderful for deterring ticks in most cases, the product only starts to work AFTER the tick has latched on, and the organism that lives in some ticks that is responsible for causing lymes disease causes the tick to transfer that organism's "lymes" thru the skin, if the tick that has latched on has that organism living in it (cant remember the name of the organism). it DOES take a bit of time for the results of lymes to show though in a test unfortunately so it is not recommended to test the animal immediately at the vets after a tick is discovered.

~QOTWR :heart:
**QueenoftheWereRats**
Fur-Mom To--> Emmy- Dobie Mix, Asher & Toadie (Full name: Toadwart)- Gpigs, Rainier (aka Mista Lizard Man)- Bearded Dragon

RIP-> Noboz- My Gpig girl, Pearl- The Beautiful Betta Boy

Offline Punkygirl0101

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2008, 10:30:13 PM »
Those over the counter products are useless, and not safe.

Please take your dog to the vet to get some vet prescribed flea and tick medicine. Frontline and revolution are the better brands.
4 Rats-6 Dogs-3 Ferrets-1 Hamster-2 Box turtles-15 Cats (including fosters)

Offline Lmbswimmer

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2008, 06:42:39 PM »
There is also a lyme vaccine for dogs.  You might want to talk to your vet about getting that. 

Offline nakedrats

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2008, 06:56:19 PM »
 Frontline is over the counter, as is Advantage.  They sell it in petsmart as well as the vets office.  Revolution is the prescription product.

Offline Vibrissa

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2008, 11:09:28 AM »
I can tell you how to healthfully and safely prevent any ticks and fleas.  From my research on how to help my dog's allergies, it ends up preventing any ticks or fleas. 

My dog had terrible skin allergies that she would scratch constantly from spring to winter every year until she bled.  The vets & canine dermatologist did every kind of test and tried all sorts of strategies and Rxs--to no avail--then threw up their hands.  It was determined it wasn’t food allergies either.  I did tons of research and talked to naturopathic and homeopathic vets and then tried Ark Naturals neem spray, Neem shampoo (there are many--for people and canines--any do), and especially the neem leaf capsules.  There are no bad side effects and have been totally okayed by all of the vets I have spoken with who have taken the time to read what it is.  It is totally safe.  It has many beneficial health side effects as well as keeping your pet flea and tick free without having to use the chemicals of Advantage, Revolution, etc.  It has been three years now and Sugar is virtually itch (and break-out) free--if she begins to have a spot--which is NOTHING like it used to be--I just spritz on and rub in some Ark Naturals neem spray and/or bathe her in the neem shampoo.  Neither dog has had ONE flea or tick in all this time.  It is thought to prevent AND kill heart worms--but that has yet to be scientifically tested.  I can direct you to articles if you would like.  There are many brands and prices for neem LEAF (never FEED neem oil) capsules, but I just use these and they work just fine:  http://www.vitacost.com/Natures-Way-Neem  These also prevent further yeast infections in dogs. The jury is still out on whether this is safe for cats or not, but it is given to horses often with great results.

Our two dogs weigh  48 and 53 lbs and take two of the capsules (coated with Smart Balance--they love it) in the morning and two more in the evening each.  Just trying  to share this information with others as years ago we had a dog and she scratched and itched her entire life even after hundreds of dollars with vets.  I wish I had the internet back then to research and find this on my own for her. Sugar is soooo much happier (me too), her groomer who works at our vet office said the first time after beginning the pills--"Wow--what are you doing for her allergies--she looks cured!"  Also, if your dog doesn’t take capsules well, they can be opened and sprinkled on the food (“supposedly” they don’t mind the taste of neem, but I have not had to do that so I don’t know for sure).   And if the dog is afraid of the neem “spray”—pour it onto your hands or a cottonball and rub over the areas.

 

Other links (vitacost.com also has Ark Naturals neem spray at the lowest price I’ve seen)

http://www.vitacost.com/Ark-Naturals-Neem-Protect-Spray

 

And I get the shampoo from here:

http://www.organixsouth.com/downloads/Pet_brochure.pdf

 

http://www.organixsouth.com/theraneem.html

 

One of the articles that states the dosage amount is:

 

http://www.naturmix.com/pages/products/neem.html

 

“The neem capsules are comprised of finely ground neem leaf and are best for internal use. Bulk neem powder is exactly the same as the contents of the neem caps. Most dogs don’t seem to have a problem eating it and we have found it to be a very convenient way of administering the dosage. Neem caps are 500mg. A good rule of thumb is to give one cap or 500mg. per 10 lbs. of body weight per day. Up to eight (8) caps a day is sufficient for large breeds weighing 80 to 100 lbs. Dosage can be slightly increased for the giant breeds. We recommend using the loose powder in the food for economic reasons. You can calculate 1 teaspoon is equal to 5 grams or 5000 milligrams or 10 caps. It is virtually impossible to over dose on neem leaf powder so if you’re fairly close on the dosage the dog will be just fine. The safety of this product is one of the great things about it. If your dog is picky or not a good eater use the capsules. These dosages can be split for a twice a day regiment. If you have run out of neem leaf powder or cannot get it, neem LEAF extract can be substituted and put in to the food or water. One ml or one dropper full is equal to about 2500 mg. of powder. For long term use, after the initial dosage is given and results are obtained, the dosage can be reduced by at least one third to one half although I have kept them on the full dosage since it is healthy in MANY other ways for them, AND we are using it to prevent fleas and ticks.  Neem LEAF is in the capsules, neem OIL is in the shampoo and sprays.

I do want to add that I have since, this past year, also done tons of research on feeding—and both dogs and cats are now on totally GRAIN FREE and (preferably potato free) foods—and all are doing WONDERFULLY!!!!

Sherry

Offline strangeduck

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2008, 10:39:40 PM »
I just want to say that if you are using your fingers to pull the ticks out, be very, very sure to wash your hands.  Ticks can carry all kinds of nasty things, besides just lyme disease.  Also, if your dog has ticks, there's a good chance your house has ticks.  Use tick spray on his bed, and there is a powder for the floor that you can vaccuum up.  Be sure and check yourself regularly for ticks until your dog has been tick free for a few weeks.  I got bitten back in January and got a nasty infection in my leg the size of two of my hands and had to take antibiotics to stop it from spreading.  I didn't even feel the tick when it bit me and it was slightly engorged, so who knows how long it was there.

Owned by 3 dogs, 2 cats, 1 snake and 3 adorable rattie boys!

Offline Vibrissa

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2008, 11:07:21 PM »
Or just use food quality (not swimming pool types) diatomaceous earth --that will kill all ticks, fleas, etc. naturally--without any risk or danger to you or your animals.  It is so safe that many people take it daily (in water) and add it to their pets' foods.  It is put in a lot of our food to prevent weevils and other bugs and to keep it from getting moist while boxed.  It has been found to have many beneficial effects in our bodies.  But most of all it has been found to be a safe product to use to kill and prevent fleas, ticks, bedbugs, roaches, mites, and other things.  It is just the molecular ground up skeletons of diatoms (plant and animal life)--to us and animals it is like powder--to them it is like cut glass.  I live in a horrible neighborhood for roaches--and was having trouble with them until I researched and tried this--haven't seen one in a year.  I like it that way--and as everyone is having a terrible ant problem in the midwest from all of the water/rain/flooding, we have not had any problem.  Just thought I would pass that on, too.

Offline Heather

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2008, 11:24:45 PM »
I would not reccommend Lyme vaccines even in endemic areas. Dogs just don't react to Lyme's Disease like people and alot of dogs test positive and never have any symptoms. If they do exhibit symptoms then a couse of doxy is prescribed. I went onto IVIS.org (my trusty info site for all sorts of info only most vets get.. ok I posed as a student and subscribed :P) and found this article, among others that pretty much say the same exact thing. I only pasted relevant parts of the article.. it talks about stuff not really pertaining to Lyme's (ie other tick borne illnesses and Lyme's stats in affected people)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In:  NAVC Proceedings 2006, North American Veterinary Conference (Eds). Publisher: NAVC (www.tnavc.org). Internet Publisher: International Veterinary Information Service, Ithaca NY (www.ivis.org), Last updated: 11-Jan-2006.

Lyme Disease: What to Do When the Snap Is Positive
M.P. Littman

School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.


ASYMPTOMATIC SEROPOSITIVE DOGS IN LYME-ENDEMIC AREAS
Since the SNAP test includes the heartworm antigen screening test, it is often used on healthy dogs. In endemic areas, veterinarians are finding many asymptomatic seropositive dogs with antibodies against the C6 peptide antigen on the SNAP test, which is a sensitive and specific test for natural exposure. Some veterinarians have decided not to use the SNAP test as their heartworm screening test precisely because they don't want to know the Lyme test results on a healthy dog. Finding a positive Lyme titer in those dogs may open a can of worms that many vets just don't want to deal with. It means educating ourselves and educating the owners. That takes time, work, even talent- maybe let's not go there. But the best veterinarians in my opinion are using the SNAP test, educating themselves, and communicating with owners, teaching them about tick control and public health issues and what there's evidence for and what there's not. I think owners really appreciate veterinarians who can do that.

Knowing the seroprevalence in healthy dogs in your community will help you assess the risk for exposure in your area. You will be able to emphasize to owners the importance of careful property landscaping as well as chemical tick control if you have the facts about seroprevalence in the neighborhood. Once you know the seroprevalence for Lyme positivity in your practice, you will also know what percentage of dogs sick with cancer, cruciate rupture, etc. will be seropositive just by chance, and that you should not be so quick to make a diagnosis of Lyme disease without doing a thorough work-up.

If you are using the SNAP test in a Lyme-endemic area, chances are you will see a lot of asymptomatic positive dogs. There are areas where 70 to 90% of the healthy and sick dogs are seropositive. A study in such an area showed no association with positive titer (or how high the titer was) for prediction of illness or severity of illness. The main questions we have when we get positive SNAP tests on healthy dogs are these: (1) Should we treat them? (2) What should we tell the owners? (3) Should we monitor them in some way? (4) Should we vaccinate them? Here are my answers.

Should We Treat Them?
I don't treat all asymptomatic Lyme-positive dogs. Most (>95%) will not get sick from Lyme disease. In some areas, 90% of the healthy dogs are Lyme-positive and I think treating all those dogs is not good medicine. Some dogs could have side effects from treatment, and using antibiotics rampantly (for one month, each dog) could cause general microbial resistance in our environment. Besides, there are studies that show that one month of antibiotics doesn't even clear all dogs of the carrier state. There are situations in which I do treat an asymptomatic dog, for instance, if it has proteinuria (see the question about monitoring below), or if the owner is very concerned about possible Lyme nephropathy for some reason.

What Should We Tell the Owners?
I tell the owners that their dog has been exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, and that most (>95%) seropositive dogs remain asymptomatic carriers in a premunitive state, and are not genetically predisposed to getting that sick with Lyme disease (different than in humans, where <10% are asymptomatic). I tell them about the experimental tick-exposure model of canine Lyme disease studied at Cornell, in which exposed 6- to 12-week-old Beagle puppies had no signs of illness until 2 to 5 months after exposure; then they had a 4-day illness that went away without treatment. The self-limiting illness included anorexia, fever, and lameness with joint swelling in the leg closest to the tick bite. Some pups had a few other episodes which were similar or even milder in the same leg or different leg, several weeks apart, but again these went away without any treatment. Older puppies had even less trouble and adult Beagles seroconverted without any signs of illness. Dogs are also different than humans in that dogs have no acute illness, whereas people often get flu-like signs and a rash soon after the tick bite. Other manifestations of Lyme disease seen in people, such as neurologic, cardiac, or skin signs are rare and not well-documented in dogs. Canine Lyme arthritis is usually very responsive to a short course of inexpensive, safe, oral antibiotics (doxycycline). I don't recommend treating healthy seropositive dogs because there is no evidence of benefit. Some dogs do seem to be genetically predisposed to having more serious forms of Lyme disease, which are probably immune-mediated diseases triggered by Lyme antigens, such as polyarthropathy (which is treated with doxycycline and sometimes steroids). If we're very unlucky, we may see immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and protein-losing nephropathy, especially in Labradors, Golden retrievers, and Shelties. That is why I recommend that all seropositive dogs be screened for proteinuria (see next question).

Should We Vaccinate These Dogs?
I do not recommend using Lyme vaccines. There is no evidence that Lyme vaccines help treat or clear the carrier state, and giving dogs Lyme antigens via vaccination may theoretically contribute to more immune-complex deposition in their kidneys or synovia, if they are so inclined. We stress good tick control in Lyme-endemic areas, because we have many tick-borne diseases to worry about besides Lyme disease.

References
1. Littman MP. Canine borreliosis. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2003;33(4):827-862.
2. Littman MP. Lyme disease in dogs. Standards of Care: Emerg and Crit Care Med 2004;6(5):1-6.


Offline Lmbswimmer

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2008, 08:07:05 AM »
Being the one who mentioned the vaccine I did mention make sure to talk to your vet.  Our dogs are "special" :) and it was definitely in their best interest to be vaccinated (In my and my vets opinion).  Our malinois came to us with Lyme - he was rescued by the state police and tested positive - I don't even know how many ticks they pulled off of him.  As a Belgian Malinois he was showing actual physical symptoms - if you know anything about the breed then you know he was sick.  He was treated for lyme with the antibiotics and was healthy by the end.  We were informed to just watch for the symptoms since if he started showing limb favoritism etc... he was definitely sick.  This is a dog that has literally run through our walls (we have holes in our dry wall) and doesn't even stop to shake off- when he favors a leg you know he is hurting. 

Our boxer has boxer cardiomyopathy - he did not as of last summer (at least his tests were not positive).  We vaccinated him because he is a high risk breed for being sick and for having arythmias - every vet visit includes an ECG, and something like lyme disease now could be his death.  He will not be getting the booster this year or any shot this year (could get intersting when we have to reregister him and he hasn't been vaccinated against rabies...) because he has stage 6 cardiomyopathy (I believe that's how it is described) and he literally might drop dead at any point in time - this is with being medicated.  Every 5-7 beats of his heart is good - the rest are just ineffective pulses.  He also has the "boxer cough" which indicates that his heart has started to enlarge.  He will be going to the vet sometime soon for a full days worth or testing and monitoring (having the human baby unfortunately has delayed this apt. since he came down with the cough 8 days before I was due to deliver!). 

We are in an area where even healthy dogs will test positive and we discussed this with our vet.  He rarely does lyme testing unless there is a valid reason - such as limb favoring etc... since almost all dogs have been exposed.  Since we routinely run our dogs in grassy fields not associated with our house, and since I have been known to bring ticks home on my uniform it made sense to us.

Though ticks are aweful easy to find on a white boxer, they are aweful hard to find on our malinois.

I think that in the majority of dogs the vaccination is pointless - and if our dogs did not have their history they would not have been vaccinated against it - our vet rarely uses that particular vaccine.  He is a very progressive vet, and he also knows when he is over his head (chinchilla dentistry) and will then do the interviews to find us a vet who will do what needs to be done - like find us the certified small animal dentist that is 3 hrs away that has clinical experience working inside chinchilla mouths.  He also likes to then look at the information - like the x-rays from that visit to further his knowledge.  In the future with the x-rays, and now knowing the techniques used to work on our chins mouth I bet my vet would be able to do the minimal amount of work needed (on going retrimming and spur removal) since it turned out not to be as serious as we thought it was. 

Offline Heather

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #16 on: May 18, 2008, 11:16:28 AM »
Being the one who mentioned the vaccine I did mention make sure to talk to your vet. 

Unfortunately though, some vets aren't as knowledgable as your's. My vet (and various others I've been around, including my cousin) encourages lyme vaccines despite the fact we're not an endemic area and all the information out there that link the vaccine to kidney problems and ineffective protection against Lymes Disease. I wanted to throw some info out there for people who have vets like mine where as soon as you ask specifics about a vaccine they're already running in the back to load one up. ::)

Offline strangeduck

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #17 on: May 18, 2008, 06:11:27 PM »
As far as vaccines go, I tend to go with only the ones that are required by law or prevent fatal illness.  The vet we have routinely taken my three-legged dog to always tries to get us to go for the lyme disease and ghiardia vaccines.  I myself have had ghiarrdia (sp?) and while it's by no means pleasant is totally treatable and rarely fatal provided adequate medical care is given.  I tend to be highly suspicious of "new" vaccines, simply because the long term research into the effects of the vaccine aren't in, and some of the studies aren't even all that conclusive on the protection the vaccines provide.
Owned by 3 dogs, 2 cats, 1 snake and 3 adorable rattie boys!

Offline Heather

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2008, 06:35:48 PM »
I tend to be highly suspicious of "new" vaccines, simply because the long term research into the effects of the vaccine aren't in, and some of the studies aren't even all that conclusive on the protection the vaccines provide.

Not to turn this into a vaccine thread but even vaccines that've been out awhile someties can cause serious adverse reactions that are not uncommon. Lepto comes to mind and also FeLV. My dog had a DHPP at 2 years when I found him and he's on a 3 year rabies only. R. D. Schultz has excellent info on canine (and I think feline) vaccine protocols, DOIs, list of adverse reactions etc.

On the topic of ticks though. I just grab them by the base and pull them out, quickly might I add. I do it that way on myself, mainly though because I am beginning to have a serious panic attack and don't have time to find tweezers, try to burn them off and all the other methods. I've tried them all on my dog and they never work. Just yank 'em off.

Offline Lise

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2008, 06:53:28 PM »
I have not tried this myself, but the other day someone swore to me that Sunlight dish detergent (straight) works.

Apparently if you use gobs of Sunlight, and immerse the tick in it... the tick will come out.  And if you have lots you can bathe the dog with lots of Sunlight.

Someone try on the next tick and let me know if this really works.  :cheeky:
|| Lise ||

The Boy: Simon  The Girls: Arizona | Karma | Pepper | Penelope 

& Always Remembered: Molly, Nora, Tevy, Lucy, Guinness, Seagram, Pixie, Cleopatra, Skye, Bella, Juno, Sasha, Gibson

Offline Heather

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2008, 11:29:57 PM »
I have not tried this myself, but the other day someone swore to me that Sunlight dish detergent (straight) works.

Apparently if you use gobs of Sunlight, and immerse the tick in it... the tick will come out.  And if you have lots you can bathe the dog with lots of Sunlight.

Someone try on the next tick and let me know if this really works.  :cheeky:

I heard the same about Dawn dish soap and nope, it doesn't work.

Offline Kati33

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2008, 03:40:38 PM »
Using any method other than physically pulling the tick out can be dangerous. Lathering them up with thick substances, burning them, etc only serves to piss the tick off which can cause them to regurgitate which is how diseases are passed.
Kati33
Watusi, Charolais, Orca, Puffin, Sloth and Sifaka the Rats
Some dogs, reptiles and a husband...
Past Rats: Jag, Otter, Wolf, Frog, Bear, Moose, Emu as in Komodo Dragon, Squirrel, Turtle, Elephant, Ox, Opossum, Octopus, Okapi, Cassowary, Goose, Squid, Coati, Flamingo, Zebu, Bo(vine)

Offline LadyRattus

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2008, 09:29:24 AM »
She still has a few ticks everyonce and a while, I guess that can't be helped..It's just that time of year..But we check her alot for them to remove them.
She's also got fleas.. >:(

Does anyone remember what the chemical was called that's bad for cats used in tick collars?

"We fight dogs we kill cats.
Ain't no traps can stop the rats!
Got no plague, and got no fleas.
We drink poison, we steal cheese!
Mess with us, and you will see.
We'll put poison in your tea!
Here we'll fight, and here we'll stay...
AND WE WILL NEVER GO AWAY!"
~Terry Pratchett

Offline Vibrissa

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #23 on: May 21, 2008, 09:39:49 AM »
hmmm--as mentioned above about the neem leaf capsules--yes, there IS a way to keep your animal TOTALLY free of fleas and ticks--and a natural healthy way--

Offline Heather

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2008, 05:41:29 PM »
Does anyone remember what the chemical was called that's bad for cats used in tick collars?

If you are going to use ANY chemicals, please use a topical solution like Revolution, Frontline or Advantage. Do not mess with flea/tick collars. I do not use preventative on my dog but if we are going out hiking or to a dog park or some place I use Natural Chemisty's DeFlea spray. It takes care of ticks, fleas and lice. http://naturalchemistry.com/products/show/43

I also found this:
"Citrus is a natural flea deterrent. Pour a cup of boiling water over a sliced lemon. Include the lemon skin, scored to release more citrus oil. Let this mixture soak overnight, and sponge on your dog to kill fleas instantly."

And here's a website for natural flea and tick control products. http://search.onlynaturalpet.com/search.aspx?searchterms=flea-tick-control