Author Topic: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?  (Read 3677 times)

Offline Hippidy

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Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« on: January 24, 2010, 11:18:45 AM »
My sister is 23 and moving out finally.  :party: She's had a dog that she took great care of. I'm trying to suggest an animal that would be a good match for her in her apartment. She wont be home enough for a dog, her bf is creeped out by cats  ::) but I know how much work my rats are and she doesn't want a pet like that. She wants something to play with and cuddle with. I think a chinchilla will be too active and wont cuddle with her a lot (at least from my experience). I don't know if what I know about rabbits is the best info so I thought I would ask your opinions  ;D Here's a couple things I would like to know:

I told her they can be potty trained and I'm pretty sure this is true. She doesn't want them pooing everywhere but I told her any rodent might and most can be potty trained. How easy is this to do? I'm hoping she goes to a shelter so keep this in mind.

How active are they? Do they play? Can you teach them something like fetch?

I think some of you do the chloroplast and cubes cages. If not what is the best cage in your opinions?

If you have any other animals to suggest please do!  :BlueDumboSmile:

Offline nakedrats

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2010, 11:29:35 AM »

I'd be worried about having a big chewer in an apartment.  If the rabbit chews the walls and woodwork, she could have a heft repair bill at moveout.  I also heard that most rabbits weren't terribly cuddly, but were more of an independent watch-em-play pet.  I'd put rabbits as similar to chins as far as wanting to be held and cuddled.

She needs a cat.  Maybe she should address with the boy what the issues are and get him past it.  Most socialized cats don't slink around all shifty-eyed being creepy...you can easily find a big loveable hunk of kitty at the shelter that loves to be held and snuggled with.  I don't see anything creepy or scary about that.  Maybe the guy had a bad experience with cats and doesn't really know how nice a friendly cat can be.  If you're anywhere near PA, I've got a foster cat for her that crawls into your lap at every opportunity.  He's very open and straight-forward about his need for attention. No creeping. :)

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2010, 11:51:40 AM »
We have two hairless cats (at my moms house) and he's ok with them he just doesn't want to be left alone with them. I really wish she could get a cat I just really don't think the bf is up for it period. This is why I'm having such a hard time... I know a cat would be perfect!

Offline Dragonfly

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2010, 12:05:30 PM »
I can see why he wouldn't want to be left alone with hairless cats.. to someone who doesn't really know cats  and their personalities  a Hairless can be a creepy kitty...
i have four cats and have always had cats in my life.. and even then I at first would be a little weird about cuddling with a hairless....
(no offense to hairless kitties or those who love them, I am just not all that used to the idea..)
that being said..
Maybe she can take her boy to the shelter or even to a pet store, just to play with the kitties and 'check out what is there.. so to speak..  Introduce him to kittens, who can be creeped out by a cute little ball of fur?
Love the Creatures. Love the baby. Love the life.

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2010, 12:12:50 PM »
It's ok I get that kind of thing a lot. It's not just the hairless cats though it's all cats. I'll try and suggest these things to her but her bf is just really.... ignorant when it comes to some things and hard headed. My cats are honestly the friendliest cats you will ever meet. Most people are unsure of them and then they soon fall in love.

Offline nakedrats

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2010, 01:00:12 PM »

My dad really hates cats, irrationally so.  He had to stay over at his aunt's house as a kid, and she had numerous un-housebroken cats in the house.  The house reeked of urine and it made him hate cats.  He doesn't talk to me about my cats or anything, but he respects the fact that I have a different opinion of them.  (I got cats after I moved out.)  Maybe this boy has had a bad experience with cats and should face the fact that not all cats are psycho or deranged, and most are nice, friendly, well-adjusted and use the litterbox.  Hard-headedness and unwillingness to be reasonable or make accommodations aren't qualities that I would like in a boyfriend.  I meet my boy half-way on issues we don't agree with, and understand when there is something that he legitimately cannot compromise on.  He didn't particularly like my ratties, so they were my responsibility and that was the end of it.  Maybe your sister should explore this issue further as an important potential problem in their relationship.  It's better to deal with things up front than find out down the road that this person is going to be stubborn and unreasonable about all sorts of things (where to live, how to raise and discipline children, spending money).

Is the boyfriend living in the apartment?  If not, she can get her own pet in her own place and he doesn't have to care for it or live with it. 

I love nakie cats!   :heart:

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2010, 02:47:29 PM »
They are a terrible couple and shouldn't be together believe me we've tried everything. He has a snake so I'm wondering if she does the "well I have to live with your snake that you feed live rodents" she may get somewhere. It's mostly his place because he will be paying for most of the bills, he just doesn't want to live alone. She also doesn't want to be alone and that's why she wants a companion animal.

But really besides a cat is there anything? I have a feeling she will get a chinchilla and I really don't know if she's ready for a rodent like that.

Offline evilhobbitgirl

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2010, 03:14:59 PM »
I consider chins a higher maintenance rodent. Rabbits and chins have some specific care that she would need to familiarize herself with. Both have very sensitive GI systems and feeding them incorrectly can kill them. If her boyfriend doesn't like cats I don't think he would like crazy chinchillas that don't sit still and can jump super high.

Some rabbits can be cuddly but its a personality thing. It will also depend on how bonded the rabbit feels toward their owner. Older spayed/neutered rabbits will be a bit more mellowed out generally. I think rabbits and cats are pretty similar. The destructive/chewing behavior that some rabbits have may go away after being altered or go away with age. My rabbit was awful when she was younger but she is 9 months old and spayed now and she rarely nibbles on baseboards or digs the carpet anymore.... It is definitely a possibility though. Litter training is easy and they are even better at it after spaying/neutering. I can mostly trust my girl when she is out. Having multiple litter boxes around the room can help.
Rabbits poop A LOT and whether litter trained or not she will have to do a lot of cage cleaning. I have to empty the litter pan every 1-2 days. Any longer and the urine smell is unbearable and the litter is soaked though. Litter is my biggest expense.

Spaying and neutering rabbits is necessary in my opinion. There are so many health and behavioral benefits it would be stupid not to. If she can prepare for that cost, the potential vet bills for GI issues that crop up (they will), buying tons of hay, and keeping up with the cleaning then a rabbit would be okay for her. A cat is so much less maintenance--she should really try to push that.

See if there is a local House Rabbit Society here. Or look for rescue bunnies on petfinder.com I'm sure there would be something listed.

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2010, 03:51:49 PM »
I know I've seen shelters that fix their rabbits on petfinder so that's what she would go for. She's spent a lot in vet bills for her dog so that's nothing new. Thank you for the info!

Offline RavensFallen16

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2010, 10:17:40 PM »
I just thought I'd put my own 2 cents? And sorry I made this SUPER long  :confused:

I have never had a rabbit who chewed. And all my guys (minus 2 brats) would cuddle. I had a long haired fella, and the rest where short haired. The long haired bun was an inside only and had a TON of interaction with people. He was the easiest (besides the cats) to train for the litter box, it was just having enough boxes randomly around to help him not have accidents. I actually have pictures of my long haired bun laying next to my two cats (who are also laying down stretched out).
I would suggest she goes and looks in a shelter. Bun's can be very easy to care for, and not actually as difficult as people make them out to be...you just have to know general care and it works out well. So long as you figure out their diet, bedding, ect, and stick to those general ideas plus cleaning cage times they aren't to bad to care for. My ferrets take twice as long to clean up after than the buns ever did.
As to buying hay, if there's any feed stores that sell bails of hay that saves a TON of money in the long run. And they have timothy, and alpapha hay on top of the cow hay. Around me they run for roughly 7 dollars a bail (which is a lot of hay actually). I also get aspen shavings from the feed store (on special order-so it costs a few dollars more but not much more) for the same size bag as pine shavings for horses stalls, these run me roughly 10 dollars every 2 months (with ferrets-whose cages get done daily- which was more cleaning than I did with my buns cages (would do every other day to keep odor down)).
I really haven't had any GI issues with my buns. I think one was brought to the vet on emergency, but it was because he hoped into something sharp (still no idea on WHAT) and almost lost an eye...they do not typically do that though...I think it was due to tools being left out when we re-did the kitchen floor.
I think the GI issues can be avoided with proper nutrition, my guys always were offered fresh greens not JUST hay, we had a hutch outside that allowed access to the ground (properly done so nothing would get in or out, and it was dug down several feet with a top on it). And we never had any GI issues. But that could have been my guys. We also fed high grade pellets from the feed store for rabbits, plus the veggies they needed (Always left over carrots, lettuce, and uneaten salad, ect). With hay, once the grass (since hay is dried grass) is cut it starts to lose nutrition, so it is really an empty feeder (hence why horses get it, its a filler for their bellies, but does have some nutrition although NOT much). My buns where always offered grass outside, of course they have to be allowed to get used to eating green grass that has no fertilizers (I live in the boonies really so no fertilizers around here).
My Cats are actually more high maintenced then the buns where...litter box daily, brushings', feeding (we have what I call the anorexic kitty since she eats to fast and makes herself puke so we HAVE to watch her with that).

**These are my own opinions expressed and no one else's, I speak through experience not just reading stuff.**

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2010, 11:38:57 PM »
Thank you that was really helpful! She just signed the lease and she's moving in mid February  :party: I'm going to try to get her to wait on a pet as long as I can because I'm not sure how long this will last. As mentioned before her and her bf don't mesh well. I will have her read this post to help her make up her mind. I think no matter what she gets she'll get a male because they're generally more laid back. I'll make sure she goes to a rescue and that way it will be easier to find a Bun that's more calm.

Offline RavensFallen16

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2010, 09:06:29 AM »
You're very welcome.
The local shelter here actually has buns who are all mostly trained to use their boxes  :shocked2:
I went to look at the dogs there since we want to adopt another one. I of course have to check out the buns, and ferrets. I'm near the Dartmouth Humane Society in MA, and seriously out of six buns only one or two didn't run right up to the cage door. So if she does decide on a bun there may be luck in shelters with friendly ones already litter trained. I asked them too if they came from the same place. Only two were from the same home, the rest were all single drop offs from different people (so who knows really) and they got a good bunch who use their litter pan for potty not a bed.  ;D
I just wanted to share that, since I went and saw this and it was rather cool to see all these super cute friendly buns.

Offline Hippidy

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2010, 10:20:03 AM »
It looks like most places on petfinder neuter/spay their bunnies. The adoption fee is pretty low as well. That will probably be a good selling point for adoption. Now I just have to get her to do her research. I told her I would buy a c&c cage for her if she gets the bunny.

Are drawfs any better than a standard bun? I thought maybe because of size it may be better but I really have no idea. I really don't know the breeds and such. I just don't know that she wants a huge bunny.

Offline evilhobbitgirl

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Re: Would a Bunny be a good match for my sister?
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2010, 02:44:09 PM »
Dwarfs live longer than larger buns and every breed has a personality stereotype. I think dwarfs have a bratty stigma. If you go here you can read the breed standard max weights according to the ARBA. More common breeds are dutch, mini lop, californian, rex/mini rex, holland lop, netherland dwarf, and himalayan. I think anything under 8-10lbs wouldn't be too big.
My girl was 4lbs 9oz when she was weighed the other week at the vet. She looks like she should weigh more, I think. She is either an english spot or a mini rex...She looks like both... Here is a picture of her next to my leg to give you an idea of her size.


That's great that most of the adoptables are already spayed/neutered. Pet store buns will not be unless they are from the Marshall's mill which I would never want to support. Spaying and neutering really is necessary. Unaltered rabbits are harder to litter train, the males may spray, and they can be hormonal and destructive. Sterilizing can stop these behaviors.

I can't remember if I referenced you here or not but I use the www.rabbitsonline.net forum since the one on here isn't very active.