Author Topic: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions  (Read 2898 times)

Offline Accidental Damage

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Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« on: July 14, 2011, 09:16:10 PM »
Well what we believe was the mother cat from our garage has shown up and is in heat. Surprisingly she came right up to me with little coaxing and is absolutely adorable, though sadly no sign of the kittens anymore.

Before we bring her in the house we want to treat her with flea and tick meds, she had a huge tick that I managed to remove and really red and sore ears (any idea what that is?), though no signs of fleas.  I am completely lost as to what I should get, our current cat got treated with frontline by the vet when we first got her but she hasn't had any since (honestly because we can't get within 10ft of her).

What would be best or most effective? And is it a monthly thing? I am hoping that this new cat will bring Molly out of her shell and that we may have a chance to treat her regularly too. I am just so confused as to what is best and the difference between frontline and frontline plus. How long do they take to work? I want to bring her in the house as soon as possible but not until I know she is bug free.

Which brings me onto wormers, any brands etc that I should buy? And can you hide the pill in something? I am assuming she internal parasites too.

We are getting her spayed probably next Wednesday at a low cost speuter place and they can vaccinate against various things at the same time. Right now money is  very tight so are any of the vaccinations optional?

I was going to get the rabies and distemper vaccine (which is apparently prevalent in GA) but the FELV vaccine is also available. It is only $10 but adding all the vaccines up with the spay and it gets pricey. How much are the various vaccines usually? I suppose I should look at it as if I go and get all the vaccines when we have more money we would have to add a vet fee on too.

Microchipping is also another thing they do that I am tempted to get but I am worried not all shelters etc check that, she would of course have a collar but that could always get lost.

She is what appears to be a pure bred siamese, what are the chances she already has a microchip? If she came from a reputable breeder might they have had that done?

I just want her treated and in the house as soon as possible.


Offline Stacy M

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 07:30:57 PM »
Frontline plus kills fleas in the egg and larva stage, which the other doesn't.   So it is more important for active infestations.

All of the flea meds should be given monthly as a preventative.

I don't know if it is just my experiences, but most of my cats were never really thrilled about other cats.

What vaccinations are required depend on if she will be an indoor/outdoor cat or indoors.  If you tell the vet you only want the absolutely required ones they should work with you.

There are a ton of rescue purebreeds.  It is worth checking for a microchip, but people dump really expensive horses so money isn't always the only factor.

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2011, 10:40:06 PM »
Frontline in most areas doesnt work well anymore, fleas have built up a resistance.

The past 6 kittens I have brought into my house have had fleas. I have had very good results with Advantage, never had a problem with them getting on the other cats. I do quarantine any new cat.

Revolution isnt as fast acting as advantage but it covers many more things because it gets in the blood and on the skin. Fleas, dog ticks, mites, mange and worms. In your case it might be your best bet. Its applied monthly.

To help the other cat I would use homeopet feline anxiety and put it in her water. It worked very well for my nervous nellie. I got it from my vet, you can order it online.

I doubt the cat is purebred siamese. I have a 100% barn cat siamese. Her brother and sister are grey and white. She is a lilac siamese, complete with crossed eyes and a long honker nose. She has a meezer merow. My hubby found her in the front room sitting on the glass table just talking up a storm... to herself. Siamese love to talk. lol

It is true people will dump any animal. I found a korat kitten under the shopping carts at the grocery store.

Heres a pic of Sidney with her brother.






Offline nakedrats

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2011, 11:14:03 PM »

I recommend Revolution over Frontline.  I've also had problems with Frontline not working well.  Advantage has worked well for me.  I'd recommend Advantage Multi or Revolution for decomtaminating a kitty that's been outside.  Those two products will take out mites as well as fleas and ticks and some worms.  After the first month, go ahead and switch to regular advantage for maintenance, but I find it well worth the extra cost for a full de-bugging up front.  Especially if you have trouble treating your indoor cat.

For worming, I recommend Drontal.  That should be broad spectrum enough to take care of anything she's got.  If you go with another product, be sure it works on tapeworm.  Fleas and tapeworm go hand in hand, so she's almost certainly got them.  Not all dewormer products kill tapes, so it's best to read the packaging to make sure it does.

If you're planning on bringing her inside, I'd highly recommend getting a FELV/FIV test run.  It's a simple blood test that takes about 5 mins and can be done when she gets spayed.  It is good to know about these things up front, as FELV is very contagious and can be lethal, and this may impact your decision to bring this cat into your house.   You should also strongly consider a 2-3 week quarantine period.  If the new kitty picked up any respiratory viruses, ringworm, distemper, etc before you brought her in, you want to limit the area that needs to be decontaminated, as well as reducing the chances your indoor kitty will catch it.  This will also give your flea treatment and dewormer time to do their jobs.  Cat quarantine can be done in the same airspace, behind a closed door.  Cats don't have rapidly lethal airborne viruses the way rats do.  Mimimizing physical contact between cats and our use of good clothes changing and handwashing works well.

Also read up on introducing cats.  Cats are very territorial, and bringing in a new cat may make your resident less happy in the short run.  There are techniques that minimize introduction stress and maximize chances of the cats getting along.  I'd be happy to list mine if you're interested.  Do not be surprised if the cats hate each other, especially since they are both females.

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2011, 09:36:33 AM »
Well both cats are currently at the speuter clinic getting spayed and Sahara is having the extra fun of the FELV/FIV tests run that you all recommended and all of the vaccines possible.

We never even see Molly to have any contact with her but I have been changing clothes/ washing hands if I go into her area.

I have been trying to read up on Intros and I am getting conflicting information. Is their a website you would recommend me reading?
Any tips / ideas would be great. Molly has been limited to the hallway bedrooms and bathroom and so we thought we would just keep them all shut off and start the introductions in the main living area where neither have been before.

Offline applecavy

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2011, 12:21:05 PM »
Molly is also a cat?
We've had an ever changing parade of cats my entire life, and we've never followed any real...process? when doing introductions before.

The new cat stays in my bedroom (only one with a locking door) for a week or two, or whenever they seem to be comfortable, and then afterwards, we just open the door.
The cats usually check one another out, might hiss or tussle a little bit, but usually not much. For the next week or so new-cat gets to stay behind locked doors at night so that there are no night-fights, and then it's door always open. I've never really looked into cat introductions, I hope I haven't been inadvertently scarring my felines.   ::)

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2011, 03:21:42 PM »
Yep, Molly is our other cat.

Well Sahara tested negative for FELV/FIV and had actually already been spayed but while under anaesthetic it was discovered she needs about 10 teeth pulled and is in fact about 8 years old. We are getting antibiotics for her mouth and need to go to our regular vet to get them removed so I guess the worry isn't over yet!

Offline applecavy

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2011, 04:19:44 PM »
Why did she need all of those  teeth pulled?!
Luckily cats have long lives, so you will still have her for some time yet.

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2011, 05:42:57 PM »
Why did she need all of those  teeth pulled?!
Luckily cats have long lives, so you will still have her for some time yet.

She hasn't had any pulled yet, because it was just a spay/neuter clinic they don't do anything besides the speuters and vaccines/tests.

They said she has really bad decay and a few are rotten with a chance of high chance of abcesses if nothing is done soon. We actually go to pick them both up tomorrow and were told we would get a more detailed rundown. The lady only really called to say she was negative for FELV/FIV. Because they have no vested interest I tend to believe that her teeth are that bad as opposed to some random vet trying to screw us for money.

Offline Marybelle

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2011, 07:49:40 PM »
Yup, you can probably believe the spay/neuter clinic that the teeth are bad.  Poor thing.  I bet it makes her mouth hurt, too!  Glad she tested negative, though!  Her being spayed is probably what made that possible.  :)

Offline sierra

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2011, 12:29:45 AM »
Since cost was a factor, just wanted to add that if they haven't already done the leukemia vaccine, and if you plan on keeping her (and your other cats) indoors-only, she doesn't need it!  (Yay for being FeLv/FIV neg!) If any of your cats have access to the outdoors, then definitely get all of them vaccinated for leukemia, but it's one of the vaccines that has the highest incidence of developing a sarcoma at the vaccine site, so I don't recommend getting it if you don't need to.

I'm sure you've already gotten a handle on the flea/tick meds, but also wanted to add that you can give any future rescues a capstar before you bring them inside.  It kills every flea on them and starts working in 30 minutes (but it only lasts for 24 hours, so you def want to get a topical product on as well).  Frontline is the only product that does ticks that is safe for cats, but as has already been mentioned, there is a lot of flea resistance to it.  I would recommend doing the capstar, applying one dose of Frontline to take care of the ticks, then keeping the kitty indoors and switching to a different monthly anti-parastie product starting next month.  I really like Advantage Multi because it's all in one - heartworm preventative, kills fleas, ear mites, hookworms, roundworms, whipworms. :)

Good luck with the upcoming dental!  I know extractions can get pricey - if your vet has dental x-ray they can take pics of the questionable teeth to determine whether or not they actually need to be extracted.  Fewer extractions = less chance of damaging the integrity of the jaw (and less pain and more chompers of course!).  Lots of vets will accept Care Credit or a similar payment option as well.

Lets see some pictures!


ETA:  As far as intros go, I've had tremendous success (success being four adult cats coexisting peacefully - they're not snuggle buddies or anything!) with the following:
-Keep the new cat in a separate bedroom.  You can swap blankets/other objects between the main area of the house and the new-cat room so the cats have a chance to get used to eachothers' scents.
-After a couple of weeks of isolation, start feeding the cats on opposite sides of the closed door.  This way they will associate the other cat's scent with positive food time! After a few days of this...
-During feeding time only, crack the door so the cats can see each other but not reach other.
-Start cracking the door during the day so they can touch noses, etc.
-When you finally let the new cat out, do it during breakfast time ;)
-Respect that the cats have to establish a relationship and there will be hissing/yeowling/chasing involved - don't interfere.  Obviously if they are actually going at it, separate them.

I have four adult cats, all adopted at separate times, that are all currently sleeping soundly on my bed, so it can be done!

Also, http://indoorpet.osu.edu/cats/ is a great resource for intros.


And, I'm sure the spay/neuter clinic scanned her a microchip - definitely, definitely recommend getting this done.  I've been a vet tech for three years, and I can't tell you the number of lost pets (cats and dogs) that we've been able to reunite with their owners thanks to this great technology!  Lots of shelters will have microchip clinics once a month where they'll microchip your pet for a very low fee.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2011, 12:41:25 AM by sierra »

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2011, 01:17:21 AM »
Regular Advantage is as safe as frontline and is very effective. I wont use advantage plus or whatever they call it, the extra ingredient is a little scary.

I would get the FELV. For this simple reason. You may end up at the vet and you cat can get exposed there.

I had a very enlightening experience after a couple hours at the e-vet. The cat that went brought home a respiratory virus. He didnt get affected. All of my other 7 cats got really sick. The first to come down with it ended up at the vets with a respiratory infection and is still fighting an eye discharge. Then it traveled through the rest like the plague. It took weeks for them all to get better. There was nothing I could do other than to watch it happen and take them to the vet as needed.

Another exciting example is when one of my cats jumped at a window screen at a moth. The screen came out of the window (new house new windows) and the cat ended up outside at 11pm. We had a heck of a time finding her, our house is surrounded by thick woods and snakes. There are other cats around so she could get exposed to anything if we didnt find her as soon as we did.

Its preventable, why take the chance.

Ive done intros 4 times over the past 3 yrs. It can make or break a cats relationship with each other. Now that you know the new one is negative you can start exchanging scents. After a while let them see each other on neutral territory but not get into a fight. Start exchanging litterbox odors and food dishes. I also exchange collars daily.

After a week or two, depending on the cats, I let the one out of the bathroom and watch the others.

The problem I have right now is one of the kittens after she came back from being spayed should have had intros again. I dont know why its been a problem but a couple of my other cats keep terrorizing her, when they were fine with her the 3 months before she went to get spayed. She fuels the problem because she bolts off in a panic anytime they get near her, if she would just stand up for herself it probably wouldnt be a problem.

Intros help to avoid the fear and the bolting that causes the other cat to become a predator and take chase and attack the other cat. Once it starts its almost impossible to stop.

Offline sierra

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2011, 02:27:48 AM »
Its preventable, why take the chance.

While I do totally understand where you're coming from, to me it's not worth the risk of a malignant and often fatal cancer developing at the site of the vaccine (for those that do vaccinate against FeLv, make sure the vaccine is administered distally - you can amputate a leg, but if the vaccine was given btwn the shoulder blades there's not much you can do about it, and that goes for all vaccines).  Of course, they are developing newer and safer leukemia vaccines everyday, but I say the sarcoma's preventable, why take the chance!

Although, last year while I was on vacation across the country, my window at home broke during a storm, and one of my cats got lose overnight - my very worst nightmare.  Thankfully, I have the best friends/family/coworkers who immediately scoured the neighborhood, put up fliers, set live traps, went by the shelter, issued lost reports, and he was recovered within 24 hours (I had only been on vacation for two days, but I was ready to take the next plane home to help look for him!  You can imagine that in a situation like this, knowing that my cat was microchipped and wearing a collar with tags gave me some peace of mind). 

The point being, things happen, even to the most meticulous of owners, and my cat could definitely have been exposed to leukemia positive kitties while he was out.  So vaccinating is definitely an individual decision, and there's no clear-cut right or wrong answer.

How are Molly and Sahara doing?
Oh, just thought of another thing to help with intros!  Feliway (or you can get a generic) is either a spray or a diffuser that is made of feline facial pheromones.  Some cats seem to ignore it, but it REALLY helps some cats reduce stress.  Worth a shot!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2011, 02:30:29 AM by sierra »

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2011, 08:29:12 PM »
Well we just went ahead and got all of the vaccines available which were rabies, distemper, leukemia.

The problem with following the intro instructions is that Molly is untouchable and we don't even see her while we are around. We had to use a have a heart trap to catch her to get spayed. Going against all advice (which I know may have and still could backfire) I followed my gut and just allowed them both out into the living/dining/family room and kitchen and they seem indifferent to each other and even both hid under the sofa together for a while. Neither has been in the areas before so its totally neutral and honestly neither are in any state to start a fight.

We are at the point of trying to decide whether to take Sahara to the E vet because she is just so out of it. She was boiling hot earlier, cannot stand without losing her balance and walks around like she is drunk. She is also just so floppy and dazed and will fall asleep in your arms which she would have never done before yesterday. Please someone tell me this is just a normal reaction to the vaccines/ anesthesia?

Offline sierra

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2011, 09:54:19 PM »
How long has it been since she was sedated?  Over a day?  If so, definitely sounds like a follow-up visit is in order!

If she just got home from the clinic and is still waking up from the anesthesia, some of the induction agents can make them act drunk/hallucinate/lethargic and can last several hours. 

At the very least, a call to the E-Vet is free and they can tell you whether or not she needs to be seen.

Offline Marybelle

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2011, 10:13:48 PM »
If it's been more than 24 hours, then a follow up visit is probably in order.  It can take some time to work through the anesthesia, but it shouldn't take that long.  Is she on any pain meds?  Sometimes the pain in the abdomen from a spay can make them walk funny and fall over, as well.

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2011, 10:31:25 PM »
She was only anesthetized long enough to shave her where they discovered she had already been spayed so no pain meds were needed.

She was anesthetized at about 2.30-3pm yesterday and at the same time shots were given.

We did call the speuter clinic earlier and they recommended going to our regular vet tomorrow for blood work in case something else is going on but if she wasn't better in a few hours to go ahead to the e-vet. Her balance has definitely improved but she is still slightly off, I was putting off going in case it stressed her out more which may have been part of the problem. Her nose is all rubbed from her trying to get out of the cat cage she was in overnight at the clinic. Thankfully she is eating, drinking and using her tray fine. I may just stay up with her and if she gets worse take her in.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2011, 10:49:57 PM by Accidental Damage »

Offline Sidders

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2011, 12:10:35 AM »
Regular Advantage is as safe as frontline and is very effective. I wont use advantage plus or whatever they call it, the extra ingredient is a little scary.

I would get the FELV. For this simple reason. You may end up at the vet and you cat can get exposed there.

I had a very enlightening experience after a couple hours at the e-vet. The cat that went brought home a respiratory virus. He didnt get affected. All of my other 7 cats got really sick. The first to come down with it ended up at the vets with a respiratory infection and is still fighting an eye discharge. Then it traveled through the rest like the plague. It took weeks for them all to get better. There was nothing I could do other than to watch it happen and take them to the vet as needed.

Another exciting example is when one of my cats jumped at a window screen at a moth. The screen came out of the window (new house new windows) and the cat ended up outside at 11pm. We had a heck of a time finding her, our house is surrounded by thick woods and snakes. There are other cats around so she could get exposed to anything if we didnt find her as soon as we did.

Its preventable, why take the chance.

Ive done intros 4 times over the past 3 yrs. It can make or break a cats relationship with each other. Now that you know the new one is negative you can start exchanging scents. After a while let them see each other on neutral territory but not get into a fight. Start exchanging litterbox odors and food dishes. I also exchange collars daily.

After a week or two, depending on the cats, I let the one out of the bathroom and watch the others.

The problem I have right now is one of the kittens after she came back from being spayed should have had intros again. I dont know why its been a problem but a couple of my other cats keep terrorizing her, when they were fine with her the 3 months before she went to get spayed. She fuels the problem because she bolts off in a panic anytime they get near her, if she would just stand up for herself it probably wouldnt be a problem.

Intros help to avoid the fear and the bolting that causes the other cat to become a predator and take chase and attack the other cat. Once it starts its almost impossible to stop.

FYI, an upper respiratory infection is not feline leukemia and therefore even if you did have your cats vaccinated for FeLV, they probably still would've picked up the respiratory virus. FeLV is not airborne, it is only spread through prolonged direct contact with an infected cat (saliva, blood, or wastes). And just like sierra said, sometimes over-vaccinating our cats do more harm than good.

Accidental Damage, if your cats are strictly indoor cats I wouldn't worry about feline leukemia and would not recommend revaccination next year.

ETA: I always use Revolution for my cats (and dog and ferret when he goes outside) and it's worked out great. :) I forgot which one I used before, but it was either some brand of Frontline or Advantage and my dog still had live fleas on her days later. :doh:
« Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 12:12:53 AM by Sidders »

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2011, 11:02:21 AM »
FYI, an upper respiratory infection is not feline leukemia and therefore even if you did have your cats vaccinated for FeLV, they probably still would've picked up the respiratory virus. FeLV is not airborne, it is only spread through prolonged direct contact with an infected cat (saliva, blood, or wastes). And just like sierra said, sometimes over-vaccinating our cats do more harm than good.

Accidental Damage, if your cats are strictly indoor cats I wouldn't worry about feline leukemia and would not recommend revaccination next year.

ETA: I always use Revolution for my cats (and dog and ferret when he goes outside) and it's worked out great. :) I forgot which one I used before, but it was either some brand of Frontline or Advantage and my dog still had live fleas on her days later. :doh:

I am not that stupid. It was an example of how EASY it is to pick up something at the vet or how easy it is for a cat to end up outside.

The virus is active for several hours outside of the body in a dry environment. It does not require cat to cat contact. I have a couple cats that get wet sweaty feet when they go to the vet. Their feet could pick something up and they could clean it off and get sick. I usually have them redisenfect an exam table and dont allow them to wander the exam room. Its when they go in the back that I have no control over. The cat that brought the crud home went in back at the e-vet for a urine draw from his bladder.

Parvo in dogs is a good example. It can be picked up off inanimate objects. At my regular vet no matter how much they disinfect an exam  room if  dog has had parvo (seems almost daily) that room is off limits to any other dog. Since I had a dog at home we werent allowed in the room with even a cat.

Unless you can guarantee someone that they will never have their pets in a compromising position it is not fair to them to tell them its safe to never vaccinate an indoor cat. Generally its believed that the titer lasts at least 3 yrs. If they are vaccinated very young they should be done again in a year and then every 3 yrs.

The non adjuvanted version of both vaccines are considered safer because its the adjuvant that causes the tumor.

In some areas 1 in 4 outdoor cats has FELV.  As cats are vaccinated the numbers improve. The chances of getting cancer from a rabies or FELV vaccine are 1 in 10,000.

Offline Sidders

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2011, 12:18:00 PM »
I am not that stupid. It was an example of how EASY it is to pick up something at the vet or how easy it is for a cat to end up outside.

The virus is active for several hours outside of the body in a dry environment. It does not require cat to cat contact. I have a couple cats that get wet sweaty feet when they go to the vet. Their feet could pick something up and they could clean it off and get sick. I usually have them redisenfect an exam table and dont allow them to wander the exam room. Its when they go in the back that I have no control over. The cat that brought the crud home went in back at the e-vet for a urine draw from his bladder.

Parvo in dogs is a good example. It can be picked up off inanimate objects. At my regular vet no matter how much they disinfect an exam  room if  dog has had parvo (seems almost daily) that room is off limits to any other dog. Since I had a dog at home we werent allowed in the room with even a cat.

Unless you can guarantee someone that they will never have their pets in a compromising position it is not fair to them to tell them its safe to never vaccinate an indoor cat. Generally its believed that the titer lasts at least 3 yrs. If they are vaccinated very young they should be done again in a year and then every 3 yrs.

The non adjuvanted version of both vaccines are considered safer because its the adjuvant that causes the tumor.

In some areas 1 in 4 outdoor cats has FELV.  As cats are vaccinated the numbers improve. The chances of getting cancer from a rabies or FeLV vaccine are 1 in 10,000.

I'm sorry, but I'm going to politely disagree with your facts. FeLV rarely spreads through other means than close contact, and only survives for a few hours outside the body, not several. Comparing Panleukopenia to FeLV isn't realistic, since they are two completely different viruses. Parvo is spread much more easily than FeLV, that's why it is a core vaccine while the FeLV vaccine is considered only optional.

Even if the vaccine is non-adjuvanted, I still wouldn't run the (minimized, but not eliminated) risk of fibrosarcomas in the area.

And your last fact, is exactly what I'm getting at. Outdoor cats need to be vaccinated, not a house kitty. Your statistic doesn't pertain to the situation I'm talking about.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 12:20:12 PM by Sidders »

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2011, 12:41:25 PM »
My point being that indoor cats are not indoors 100% of their lifetime. Vet trips and accidentally getting outside can lead to exposure.

There is still a chance of getting exposed at the vets. It may not be as easy as parvo or the respiratory virus we brought home but there is still a chance.

I used to work in a virology research lab.  HIV is active for 20 min. Are you willing to take the chance exposing yourself to unknown bodily fluids?  It could have been there 20 min or 2 hrs. How would you know.

The vet doesnt close down for 2 hrs between cats. What difference does it make if its 2 hrs or 4 hrs if you dont know when the area was contaminated.

Cats arent always checked. The vet may not even know the cat had FELV that was there right before you.

Offline Sidders

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2011, 02:42:31 PM »
I base vaccines on the chance my cat has at getting the disease. Parvo is very easily spread, so I do opt for vaccination. I may get hit by a car leaving my house, does that mean I shouldn't leave my house? Of course not, because even if there is a chance I get hit, the chance is not high enough for me to stay inside 24/7. Vaccinating for FeLV is not worth it for an indoor adult cat, and clearly neither of us are going to agree with each other. I'm here to give people the other side of the argument before they vaccinate their cats with every vaccine on the market just because their vet "says so" and wants to make more money. The vaccine is only 75-85% effective, with most cats developing a natural immunity as they age (http://ucat.us/vaccines.html). Again, I go back to the "chance" of a cat being infected with FeLV. A cat with extremely low risk and given its natural immunity (though of course not 100%) should not be vaccinated.

Okay, I'm done here. Going back and forth accomplishes nothing.

Offline Dragonfly

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2011, 04:57:47 PM »
I didn't read all of the posts, I am sorry, I don't have any advice as far as the vaccines go, though I would sure opt for the rabies and at least a test for feline aids, and lukemia.. the aids can be transmitted to your current kitty..

I don't know where you are located but in my area (northwester CT and other surronding areas) the fleas and ticks have developed an immunity to frontline products.. I am not sure about revolution..
We have been treating our cats with advantage  with great results.. The dog gets advantix.

just my two cents..
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Offline sierra

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2011, 08:44:34 PM »
How's the kitty doing?

Offline Accidental Damage

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #24 on: August 12, 2011, 08:35:25 AM »
Sahara is doing great, thanks for asking!  I think it just took her a lot longer than I ever thought to get over being anesthetized and then her body dealing with the vaccines. We are hoping to take her to the vet next week for a consult and talk about her teeth and bloodwork we may want done.

Also good news on the introduction front, we are actually seeing Molly around so much more than before and while they aren't best chums they seem interested in each other. The only sign of anything aggressive was when Molly inadvertently followed Sahara into the hallway and Sahara felt trapped and had no way out but passed her and she hissed. Molly will also sit and watch us cuddle and stroke Sahara so I am hoping she may see that we are here for other things besides trapping her.

Offline Dragonfly

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #25 on: August 12, 2011, 04:51:35 PM »
I don't mean to hijack.. but it doesn't really make sense to me to start a new thread as this question may help others who are introducing cats that read this..

what happens when you go to intro a new cat into a multicat household and the new kitty REFUSES to leave the room in which they were quarintined?

Case in point: Cupcake. We've had her almost 2 years now and she refuses to leave her spot- in the old house it was her corner the first place she escaped to when QT was over and during intros.

in the new place she refuses to leave the bathroom, at first we did everything we could to get her out, there was no litter box in the bathroom and she was fed and watered outside the room. She used the bathtub as a litter box, and lost a bit of weight and got herself dehydrated.  Now she has her own litter box, and is fed and has a supply of water in the bathroom..

what can be done?!

End Hijack.. sorry.

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Offline Marybelle

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2011, 08:15:23 PM »
Sahara is doing great, thanks for asking!  I think it just took her a lot longer than I ever thought to get over being anesthetized and then her body dealing with the vaccines. We are hoping to take her to the vet next week for a consult and talk about her teeth and bloodwork we may want done..

Make sure you alert your vet to her long recovery time.  Whether it was a reaction to the vaccines or to the anesthesia, they need to know, especially if they'll be anesthetizing her for her dental work.  You may have already though of it, and they may already know, but I just wanted to make sure to mention it so it doesn't get missed.

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #27 on: August 12, 2011, 11:15:40 PM »
I don't mean to hijack.. but it doesn't really make sense to me to start a new thread as this question may help others who are introducing cats that read this..

what happens when you go to intro a new cat into a multicat household and the new kitty REFUSES to leave the room in which they were quarintined?

Case in point: Cupcake. We've had her almost 2 years now and she refuses to leave her spot- in the old house it was her corner the first place she escaped to when QT was over and during intros.

in the new place she refuses to leave the bathroom, at first we did everything we could to get her out, there was no litter box in the bathroom and she was fed and watered outside the room. She used the bathtub as a litter box, and lost a bit of weight and got herself dehydrated.  Now she has her own litter box, and is fed and has a supply of water in the bathroom..

what can be done?!

End Hijack.. sorry.

Try Homeopet anxiety relief and see if that doesnt help. It wont work long term (longer than 3 mos) but if it helps short term you can try prozac for a longer effect.

I have a cat that would hole up in the office. She would leave to eat and would pee on the kitchen counters and hubbys clothes and poo in the litterbox. the homeopet helped so much that she actually came out and visited with a stranger in the house. It just didnt last long enough even giving her a break off it.

The prozac was rough on her mentally at first but after about 2 wks she adjusted. She can be found just about anywhere in the house now and has had two peeing incidents. I havent tried her around a stranger yet.

Offline Dragonfly

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Re: Frontline or Revolution & Vaccination Questions
« Reply #28 on: August 13, 2011, 09:46:36 AM »
Thanks Forky Fork! I'll have to look into it and see if it helps. I don't think Diver helps the situation because he does have a bit of a problem with wanting to play with the kitties when the kitties don't want to play....  But that's a work in progress!
Love the Creatures. Love the baby. Love the life.