Author Topic: Helping Diver adjust to a New Baby  (Read 755 times)

Offline Dragonfly

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Helping Diver adjust to a New Baby
« on: October 23, 2012, 10:11:26 AM »
I am 28 weeks pregnant with my first daughter and I am wondering how all of the other new moms (and dads) on goose moose helped their fur kids adjust to the little human?

So far, I've had my friends with children come over to play (none of which are younger than 3 unfortunately), I've you tubed baby screaming/crying/ laughing and played that, The crib is set up and he's learned to leave it alone, we don't have the car seat yet but I am going to de-sensitives him to that the same way I did the crib. Any other suggestions?
Love the Creatures. Love the baby. Love the life.

Offline Sorraia

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Re: Helping Diver adjust to a New Baby
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2012, 12:19:54 PM »
While the baby and I were in the hospital, my husband took home blankets and clothing she wore so the dogs could sniff it. The first 3-5 days I was home I stayed in the bedroom with the baby, and the dogs were blocked from coming in with a baby gate. They could still hear the baby, but they couldn't see or touch her. I just didn't feel like dealing with them any way (I had a c-section). When I started feeling well enough to move around more, I would carry the baby to the end of the hall where the dogs could see her. They were allowed to look and sniff, but couldn't touch. My husband also let them smell some of her dirty diapers. Finally they were allowed back in the bedroom, and they could watch her and sniff her while in the bassinet. If they started acting "iffy", we would correct them with a firm "leave it". We actually started getting more worried about them attacking each other than hurting the baby (my older dog is a "nanny dog" and was being protective of the baby). We haven't had any problems with the dogs or the baby, and she's now 8.5 months old, crawling around, and actually interacting with the dogs.
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Offline Dragonfly

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Re: Helping Diver adjust to a New Baby
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2012, 12:27:32 PM »
I think Diver is going to be a bit of a nanny dog. He's incredibly protective of me (and my husband to a certian extent, but more so towards me) He's been incredibly good about not climbing on to me or jumping on me or my belly. He started acting that way before we even knew were were pregnant.

He also won't let other people touch me or the belly. He's fine when they are at the house (or when we are out and about) conversing with others, but as soon as they reach into to touch the belly (WHY, WHY Do people insist on doing that?) He gets a bit uppity and will come push his way between us.

I am hoping that translates to being protective of the baby and not jelouse when she gets here.

We are also planning on including him as much as possible in our everyday activities as we have been doing since he was a puppy. He is still going to go for rides with us and visit people with us so I am also hoping that helps.
Love the Creatures. Love the baby. Love the life.

Offline Sorraia

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Re: Helping Diver adjust to a New Baby
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2012, 12:46:02 PM »
It does sound like he'll do just fine! :)
My younger dog has had some jealousy issues with the baby, in the recent months. At first she was looking at the baby as one of the cats, "below" her. Now she's look at the baby as a sibling, "equal" to her. I've been working on reinforcing her training to teach her the baby is a person, and therefore "higher" than her. With lots of "leave it" practice, she's learning, but I still have to watch her. I don't let her get as close or interact as much as my other dog. I know the limits of my dogs and read their body language, so I know when my baby can or shouldn't interact with them, and to what extent, as long as I am right there, of course!
NOM-ology A study in rat nutrition.
http://nom-ology.blogspot.com

Confessions of a Rat Breeder
http://bwr-rats.blogspot.com/