Author Topic: Declawing and diabetes?  (Read 1966 times)

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Declawing and diabetes?
« on: February 08, 2013, 02:12:59 PM »
My friend has a 7 month old male kitty, a beautiful Siamese mix.  He recently got neutered, which I'm pretty sure he needed.  His hormones (my friend says) were really whacking him out.

But now she says in the next few weeks the kitty will be going to the vet's office to be declawed, both front AND back.  I don't agree with declawing.  Abby used to use her claws a LOT on us, but we finally got her settled down enough that we no longer worry she will draw blood, even while playing.  But my friend is blaming the declawing on her husband's diabetes.

Is this a worry with diabetics?  She says that Smoky would shred her husband's arms and draw blood each time.  I recommended they try Kitty Caps, or whatever other names the silicone claw caps come by, and she says she couldn't find any where she lives.  Granted, she is wheelchair-bound and trying to get from point A to point B can be difficult, but wouldn't the vet's office have them also?  I think she just didn't look for the caps but told me she did just to make me stop telling her not to declaw her cat, especially front and back.

I told her today that I know it is going to be done to her cat, and I don't believe in having it done so I don't want to talk about it.  Especially since she won't listen to me.  All I say on the subject falls on deaf ears.

Offline mutewolf

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2013, 02:54:00 PM »
Unfortunately I don't know a thing about the diabetes but it's a shame she's getting it done. Especially both. There's too much literature out there showing why it's such a bad idea. I'm actually surprised she has a vet that's willing to do it. I thought a lot of them were starting to refuse to. He's only 7 months old, I doubt he understands that he can't play with soft people flesh the same way he would play with another cat.

You can order those kitty caps offline. Petsmart sells them, Amazon, etc. But it sounds like she's really not listening to you. Lots of support and love to the poor cat.

Offline Marybelle

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2013, 04:20:26 PM »
If someone is having complications from diabetes, cuts can rapidly turn septic.  However, there are better ways of dealing with it than declawing the cat front and back.  Grrr.

ETA:  Also, if they declaw, there's a very good chance that the cat will start using it's teeth.

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2013, 04:52:46 PM »
Thank you, mutewolf and Marybelle.  I feel so sorry for her boy.  Marybelle, I didn't know that about diabetics!  I guess I can understand him not wanting to get scratches, but to remove the kitty's toes!  And having all his claws removed, what if he escaped his home one day?  He can't fight back, nor climb a tree, can he?  I don't know if a cat can climb a tree without his hind claws.  I THINK they still can with the front claws removed.

mutewolf, I'm also surprised she found a vet willing to remove all his claws.  Is it different in Canada?  That is where she lives.

Offline mutewolf

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 05:00:14 PM »
No, I don't think he'll be able to climb. He'll also have psychological issues, IIRC.

I don't know anything about Canada and their stance. It's still really unfortunate.

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2013, 05:16:06 PM »
No, I don't think he'll be able to climb. He'll also have psychological issues, IIRC.

I don't know anything about Canada and their stance. It's still really unfortunate.

Geez!  She is already worried about him having neurological issues.  She has him scheduled for a vet visit because he keeps running into walls!  She is going to have one mentally messed up cat.

Offline GhostMouse

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2013, 06:02:57 PM »
No, I don't think he'll be able to climb. He'll also have psychological issues, IIRC.

I don't know anything about Canada and their stance. It's still really unfortunate.

It can cause psychological issues, cause him to bite harder, and cause him to stop using the litter box. You could also send her this site.

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2013, 06:18:03 PM »
No, I don't think he'll be able to climb. He'll also have psychological issues, IIRC.

I don't know anything about Canada and their stance. It's still really unfortunate.

It can cause psychological issues, cause him to bite harder, and cause him to stop using the litter box. You could also send her this site.

Thank you so much!  I will forward this to her.  I can only hope she will read it.

About her cat and his scratching, I do wonder if her husband plays roughly with Smoky.  I do know her husband is loud and sorta brash, so it is possible Smoky doesn't like how loud he is.

Offline GhostMouse

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2013, 06:39:30 PM »
No problem. This is an issue I'm rather passionate about, so anything to help.

At 7 months old, the kitten also has a lot of maturing to do. He's still learning bite/clawing inhibition during play (and other times). You might mention that he will likely grow out of a lot of this behavior once he reaches 2 or so (varies from cat to cat). Although he'll look like a grown cat at this point, he's still very much a baby.

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2013, 08:23:32 PM »
My Abby has outgrown a lot of those bite/clawing things, and she will be 2 in April.  Plus, kitties give signs they are going to scratch, so it is also possible my friend and her husband aren't reading his signs.

Offline forkyfork

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2013, 11:29:40 PM »
I have 8 cats and rarely get scratched. If I do its because Im asking for it. They get their nails clipped. I put them on the bed on their feet, I put my left hand over their shoulders and use that hand to open their claws and snip them with my right.

The new cats are a little afraid, I stop when they start to freak a little, then later I try again. I only have one cat that is resistant to get his nails clipped and will bite. He is also really wiggy about being held and is nervous. My other "normal" cats are fine.  He will now let me get one paw done before he totally wigs out.

I have a barn cat siamese. She doesnt run into things but is pretty much blind from being cross eyed. I poorly bred siamese will be cross eyed. Their brain wiring is supposed to compensate but after watching my cat swat at things from 6" away its obvious she cant see well. Its pretty interesting to watch her navigate around a new thing on the floor.

Offline nakedrats

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2013, 02:36:07 PM »

I'd also emphasize the tendency to bite.  If she's worried about superficial scratches getting infected, then she's going to have a great time with cat bite wounds.  Those frequently get horribly infected in healthy people.  I had a front declawed foster kitty, and she bit for self defense. 

Maybe she should rehome the cat and get her husband a goldfish.  Those don't break skin.

Offline Lil Red

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2013, 08:16:36 PM »
I have two Siamese cats and I trim their nails regularly.  On my bed, I play a game with my cats where I move my hands under the covers and they attack them.  They use their claws when they "attack" but as long as I keep their nails trimmed, they don't break the skin.  There are better and more humane ways to prevent scratches than declawing.  I wish your friend understood that.  Good luck!

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2013, 06:38:57 PM »
So I told my friend what the vet does to declaw a cat.  She got real quiet for a few seconds, then said she didn't know that.  So now she is rethinking what to do, and possibly looking again for the kitty caps. 

Offline Marybelle

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2013, 07:47:01 PM »
So I told my friend what the vet does to declaw a cat.  She got real quiet for a few seconds, then said she didn't know that.  So now she is rethinking what to do, and possibly looking again for the kitty caps.

I'm glad she didn't realize.   That means education stands a chance of changing her mind.  :)

Offline gramma2jaakk

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Re: Declawing and diabetes?
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2013, 09:29:26 PM »
So I told my friend what the vet does to declaw a cat.  She got real quiet for a few seconds, then said she didn't know that.  So now she is rethinking what to do, and possibly looking again for the kitty caps.

I'm glad she didn't realize.   That means education stands a chance of changing her mind.  :)

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