Author Topic: Getting ready to adopt  (Read 673 times)

Offline Chasiti40

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Getting ready to adopt
« on: March 02, 2016, 12:54:37 AM »
        I'm getting ready to adopt 3 little girls from a lady who's dad breeds for snakes I feel I'm saving them from being food Im getting a hairless and 2 others from the pics I have seen they look healthy but looks like they r on the wrong kind of bedding what are some things I should do when I bring them home and what should I watch for....
Love my ratties

Offline ILoveMyRatties

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Re: Getting ready to adopt
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 01:29:50 AM »
They will just breed more rats. Yes you are saving THOSE 3 rats, but 3 other rats will take their place- 3 other rats that might not have been bred in the first place. It is not like 3 snakes will skip their weekly/monthly meal because you adopted rats from them:(

Offline gawgeouspaws

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Re: Getting ready to adopt
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2016, 02:14:37 AM »
They will just breed more rats. Yes you are saving THOSE 3 rats, but 3 other rats will take their place- 3 other rats that might not have been bred in the first place. It is not like 3 snakes will skip their weekly/monthly meal because you adopted rats from them:(

I was holding off on saying this, but ILoveMyRatties has a point. If you purchase those babies, the money will just go towards breeding more unfortunate babies to take their place. Now, if you get them for free, then it counts as rescue because you aren't providing profit for someone to turn around and breed more rats. I know how you feel. My first two girls were from the feeder tank at a pet store, and I truly felt like I was rescuing them. All I was really doing was providing more money for whoever bred them into that bad situation to keep putting more babies into that same situation. I don't regret it one bit, but I do wish I'd known that it's always better to rescue ratties that are already in need than to fund the endless cycle of feeder breeding. My current two boys are rescues, and it's tremendously rewarding to know that I could give them a home without contributing to the cycle of poor rats who are bred without regard for genes, health, or temperament just to be fed to snakes.

That being said, whatever you decide, you still need information. Any new rats you bring into your home should be kept completely separate from your current rats unless someone extremely well-versed in rats has already cleared them of illness/parasites/etc. Rat/small mammal rescues are generally trustworthy because they have experience. I don't know if I would trust a feeder breeder's word on whether or not they're healthy; they might breed a lot of rats, but that doesn't mean they know rats because they don't care about them on a pet-level. Plus, if this breeder can't even keep them on proper bedding, I doubt they care much for how healthy they are. This quarantine should last about 3 weeks, and you should always wash your hands in between handling each group. Watch for anything like sneezing (some sneezing when they arrive in a new place is normal, but sometimes it gets excessive, which can be a sign of upper respiratory infection, common in rats) or extra discharge from the nose or eyes.

They'll need a separate cage. 1) For their quarantine if you "adopt" from the feeder breeder. 2) As a separate place for them to live as you begin the process of introductions between your current rats and the new rats. Babies tend to have smooth intros, but you never know. Going slow is always best.

You need to make sure your current cage is big enough to house that many rats, especially once they're full grown.

Also know that hairless rats are prone to build up in their eyes because they lack protective fur/lashes to keep crud from building up in their eyes. A lot of hairless rat owners have to flush their eyes every so often because of this.

I can't really think of anything else at the moment.
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