Author Topic: Growing teeth  (Read 400 times)

Offline RattyRodent

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Growing teeth
« on: February 26, 2017, 11:52:40 AM »
Our rat Trixie is our oldest rat - three years and four months. After her cagemate died, Trixie soldiered on, but she is much feebler now. I don't know if this is something that happens as they become elderly, but her teeth won't stop growing and we have to take her to the vet practically every week for a trim. She doesn't like it at all and wiggles so much during the procedure that the vet needs to use gas to make her sleep during the trim

On the last visit we were told that we may only be able to do this so long, since at her age she might not wake up from the gas at some point. On the other hand, we can't let those teeth keep growing. Comments?

Offline SarahD

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Re: Growing teeth
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2017, 12:21:22 PM »
Is she still eating normally?  Eating hard foods?  Has there been any sort of injury or trauma that caused the teeth to not line up properly?  How is the veterinarian trimming the incisors?  If the vet is using a clippers of some sort to clip the teeth then he/she could actually be making the problem worse in the long run.
mom of 7 rats
RVT at an all exotic specialty clinic
Founder of EARPS, Inc.

Offline RattyRodent

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Re: Growing teeth
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2017, 05:19:34 PM »
She is eating normally - Oxbow chips -  and we keep giving her hard things to chew like raw carrots and dog biscuits but the teeth keep growing. Some of them don't seem to be lined up properly but we don't know how that happened or what to do about it. The vet uses clippers that are commonly used on cat's toenails. We tried some clipping ourselves until she got too wiggly.

Offline BigBen

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Re: Growing teeth
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2017, 09:31:51 PM »
Rats' teeth never do stop growing.  Trixie's problem is that her incisors have become misaligned, and she can no longer keep them ground down by bruxing.  This can happen at any age, from congenital abnormality, injury, or--as you are finding--old age.  It would be nice to know what the vet thinks is the cause of Trixie's trouble.  Perhaps it is something treatable?  (Of course, at forty months of age, Trixie is a grand old lady rat, and at her age the treatment may be worse than the problem.)
What is a rat?  King-sized love in a pint-sized package.
RatCode:  2m2f21r !B C? D+ F S-- ocA reC sM a+++ e++++ n